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Replied to Webmention + Books = BookMention by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Part of my plans to (remotely) devote the weekend to the IndieWeb Summit in Portland were hijacked by the passing of Muhammad Ali. Wait... What?!
Google Books exports highlights and marginalia to a Google Doc titled Notes from “Book Title.” The document includes the highlighted text or the note and a hyperlinked page number. Because it’s in this format, I imagine it wouldn’t be too hard to extract the data via copy paste or maybe even downloading the doc as HTML. I expect the CSS would need some massaging, and obviously this is still a siloed start, but it’s something.
Filed an Issue dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)
adds support for responding to and interacting with other sites using the standards developed by the Indieweb Community - dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds
When I use Post Kind WordPress editor URLs with the ?kindurl= extension, I get an editor window that only has a title box and a response properties box but nothing else, and the response properties box only has the “response properties” title and no content. I first encountered this with Inoreader’s custom URL feature but found it also occurred when inputting the editor URL directly into my browser’s address bar. Here’s an example URL I might give Inoreader, where [URL] is Inoreader’s URL variable: example.com/wp-admin/post-new.php?kindurl=%5BURL%5D&kind=reply
If I do it with just kind=reply without trying to use kindurl=, it’s a normal editor with reply selected as the post kind and a blank response properties box as you’d expect.

WordPress post editor only displaying title box and empty response properties box

Replied to 👓 Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote | Greg McVerry by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich
Read Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote by Greg McVerry Greg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)I am happy to announce that Kimberly Hirsh will join us as the key note for IndieWebCamp New Haven. I can’t wait to hear what Kimberly Hirsh comes up with for the upcoming camp! Syndicat...
I can’t wait to see what I come up with, either! I’ve been trying to track down other keynotes via the IndieWeb YouTube channel to see what kind of thing people generally do. Any suggestions, either for topic or examples? (Right now I’m brainstorming something about the IndieWeb as a Connected Learning environment, but I’m not sure if that’s the kind of thing that makes sense.)
RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp New Haven
IndieWebCamp New Haven 2019 is a gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.
Attending remotely, as I’m able given I have a toddler. And, oh yeah, keynoting!
Replied to RSS Feeds: A Follow up on My IndieWeb Commitment 2017 (BoffoSocko)
Fix my site's subscription/mail functionality so that I can better control what current subscribers get and allow for more options for future subscribers.
I started implementing separate RSS feeds for different types of content a while back but just set them up to appear in the content search in readers like Feedly. They look great. Thanks for the walkthrough, Chris!

Dissertating in the Open: Your First Meeting with Your Committee

It’s been more than 3 months since I had my first committee meeting, but I still want to write a little about the process.

If you’ll recall, my advisor, Sandra Hughes-Hassell, and I put together an awesome committee. She handled the scheduling of our first meeting, which we did using Zoom as I have two out-of-town committee members.

Before the meeting, I shared two things with my committee: a dissertation prospectus and a preliminary bibliography.

The main agenda item for the meeting was reviewing that preliminary bibliography and settling on the areas for my comprehensive examination package. One of my committee members couldn’t make it; there were 5 of us on the call. I had my prospectus and bibliography in front of me and my bullet journal at hand for taking notes. (My method is really a hybrid of Ryder Carroll’s bullet journal method and Raul Pacheco-Vega’s Everything Notebook, with some modifications of my own thrown in, but that’s a different blog post for a different day.)

I can’t tell you how this will go for you, but it had a couple of really positive outcomes for me.

First, with respect to information literacy: There is a whole world out there of information literacy standards, guidelines, and models, and quite frankly, by the time you’ve been working in this field for 10 years the basics start to get a little stale. I had them all on my preliminary bibliography and Casey Rawson suggested that, since we all know those models and nobody really wants to read about them again, I could focus on newer models. She specifically mentioned embodied information practices (especially as conceived by Annemaree Lloyd), as my research focuses on the information practices of cosplayers and cosplay is an embodied fan practice.

I mentioned to the committee that I was going to start with a focus on information literacy in affinity spaces and work my way out from there, and Heather Moorefield-Lang suggested that I consider subcultures as well as affinity spaces, specifically suggesting the work of Vanessa Lynn Kitzie, who has done a lot of work on the information practices of LGBTQ+ individuals.

Taking these two suggestions together led me to a complete reframing of my conceptualization of information practice and information literacy, moving me from thinking of it as an individual, knowledge-based process to a sociocultural set of practices. More on that another time, but this was a huge and immensely valuable shift.

Second, with respect to methods: Casey pointed out that the “mixed methods” piece of my study (counting qualitative codes for frequency) wasn’t really enough to qualify it as a true mixed methods study, and so it might be better for me to just focus my methods chapter on qualitative methods. This was great because it always helps me to narrow my scope; I tend to want to be far more thorough than is necessary or appropriate when I write a literature review.

After the meeting ended, I felt great. I was really excited about my work and excited about my committee, and those feelings have carried me through the last three months of slowly chipping away at the first two chapters of my comps package.

Featured image is the Chamber of the Council of 13 of the Guild of Calamitous Intent, from Venture Bros, provided by reddit user Empyrealist.