Bookmarked A Closet Cosplayer Shares Her Tips on Dressing Up With What You Already Have (POPSUGAR Love & Sex)

Standing at 4’5″, Little Women: Dallas star Asta Young is a small woman making a big name for herself in the world of fandoms.

A conversation with @marijel_melo confirmed a suspicion I had that to a non-cosplayer, saying you were a “closet cosplayer” sounded like you were saying you were a cosplayer on the DL, “in the closet” about your cosplaying, as it were.

Closet cosplay is, rather, a term of art referring to “using what you have from your closet, with maybe a couple cheap store-bought items put together” according to Asta Young in this PopSugar piece. I use it to mean that I’m wearing things that weren’t built explicitly for cosplay, like the Coldwater Creek dress I used for River tam, the thrifted top I used to be Mrs. Lovett, the Old Navy dress I used to be the Fruity Oaty Bar Octopus Lady, the LL Bean pajamas I used to be Jess Day, or the Victorian Gothic getup from Retroscope Fashions (RIP but still on Etsy I guess?) that, yes, I just had hanging in my closet, and also used to be Shojo Loki.

I’m still working out what cosplay-related content will go here at kimberlyhirsh.com vs what belongs to Luna Wednesday, obviously.

 

Read Connected learning ecologies as an emerging opportunity through Cosplay

Connected learning explains how people can build learning pathways that connect their interests, relationships, and formal learning to lead toward future opportunities such as careers. However, most learning systems are not set up ideally for connected learning; for instance, most schools still teach disciplines as discrete units that do not connect to students’ interests outside of school. We do not yet know enough about the structure of naturally occurring connected learning ecologies that do connect youth learning across contexts and help them follow pathways toward careers and other desired outcomes. Learning more about what works well on these pathways will allow us to design connected learning environments to help more youth access to these desired opportunities. This paper analyzes two case studies of cosplayers –hobbyists who make their costumes of media characters to wear at fan conventions–who benefited from well-developed connected learning ecologies. Cases were drawn from a larger interview studyand analyzed as compelling examples of connected learning. Important themes that emerged included relationships with and sponsorship by caring others; unique pathways that start with a difficult challenge; economic opportunities related to cosplay; and comparisons with formal school experiences. This has implications for how we can design connected learning ecologies that support all learners on unique pathways toward fulfilling futures.

Bender, S., & Peppler, K. (2019). Connected learning ecologies as an emerging opportunity through Cosplay. Comunicar, 27(58), 31–40.

Bender and Peppler analyze case studies of two cosplayers “who benefited from well-developed connected learning ecologies” to identify themes that might be useful in designing connected learning environments. They identified the following themes: “relationships with and sponsorship by caring others; unique pathways that start with a difficult challenge; economic opportunities related to cosplay; and comparisons with formal school experiences.”