My Notes from #CLS2022: Rising Scholars - Exploring Pathways: Finding Your Place of Impact

Wendy Roldan:

introducing the panel Exploring Pathways: Finding Your Place of Impact

is a UX researcher at Google, place of impact with users in studies at work

Kiley Sobel:

UX researcher at Duolingo with ABC app focused on kids' reading in their native language, impact is with learners, kids, families, parents, teachers, and the product itself

Deborah Fields:

works for Utah State University but lives in Long Beach, CA, does curriculum design, teacher education, and research, always exploring new pathways for impact

Andres Lombana-Bermudez:

based in Bogota, Colombia, Associate Professor at Universidad Javeriana, research center in Colombia, and Berkman at Harvard. Impact follows a winding and networked pathway. Part of the Digital Media & Learning Initiative since the beginning.

I (Kimberly) love hearing how varied Andres's pathway has been! Focuses on projects & collaborations as much as positions/institutions. <3!

Jennifer Pierre:

UX Researcher at YouTube working on fan-funding, also instructor and affiliated researcher at universities

Wendy Roldan:

What strategies/values/criteria did you use to navigate your own process of finding your place of impact? What helped ground you? What did you prioritize?

Deborah Fields:

Find the heart of who you are and what you want to do and keep it at the center as you try a bunch of different things.

is knitting right now. I'm (Kimberly) crocheting right now!

goal was to support youth across their lives & now does so through curriculum design, teacher education, research.

Be open to relationships and opportunities. Sometimes you feel like you're pushing against a wall. Take a break from pushing against the wall and look for what's already open.

Making connections across spaces (eg families & institutions, communities & workspace) is the heart of Debbie's work. Allowing parts of life outside research to come through in research life.

Andres Lombana-Bermudez:

Impact is a moving target in the face of change. Be attuned to your context. Grasp opportunities as they appear.

Pay attention to communities and mentors who give you space to join your interests.

It takes energy to keep finding projects, grow, connect, build communities.

Jennifer Pierre:

Searching for the intersections where your impact will be takes time and work. Think about the types of impact you want your work to have, what outcomes do you want your work to have? Who do you want to be affected? In what ways?

YouTube team leveraged specific work from Jen's dissertation to impact product development and that was really exciting.

Kiley Sobel:

tried a lot of things out in grad school. Academic research, contributing to academic community & body of knowledge, direct impact on kids in classrooms, volunteered at conferences, TAed, volunteered in early childhood classroom, internships.

Applied to lots of different jobs, teaching postdocs at liberal arts, faculty at R1, UX at big tech company, research scientist at non-profit. Paid attention to what held a draw.

Started @ Joan Ganz Cooney Center impacting policy from 30,000 feet view, wanted next to get experience working on a specific project. Important to recognize that whatever you're trying now isn't something your locked into forever.

Wendy Roldan:

Any standout moments that led to the work you're doing now?

Kiley Sobel:

The interview process gave specific signal into whether community was energizing.

Deborah Fields:

Unsuccessful job search led to postdoc with mentor Yasmin Kafai on e-textiles grants. Didn't get job at Cooney Center that Kiley did but DID get work from them doing a lit review with a colleague from a different grad school.

Wendy Roldan:

Sometimes saying NO is what leads you to your impact.

Jennifer Pierre:

Echoes Wendy's point. Saying no clarifies priorities: I want to live in a particular place, I don't want to live away from my partner. Also echoes Kiley's point about gut checks.

Wendy Roldan:

How would you suggest going about finding opportunities to explore places of potential impact?

Andres Lombana-Bermudez:

Try & apply to different things. Doing an internship during PhD program in a crisis led to connecting with a community of mentors and peers encouraging a networked, omnivorous mindset.

You need a lot of luck. The more that you try, the more opportunities you'll be able to grasp.

Deborah Fields:

Sometimes the closed doors are powerful in opening up new opportunities.

Jennifer Pierre:

Apply to jobs in places you might not have thought you would end up.

You might need to be more assertive than you would normally be, introduce yourself to people whose work you admire.

Kiley Sobel:

Relationships are important even if you have to foster them yourself.

Deborah Fields:

Academic mentors are good at academia but you might have to look outside academia for people who can mentor you in other areas.

If you're following up on a connection, you may need to remind them how you connected before. You don't know where relationships will lead.

Kiley Sobel:

It might not be someone who is already in a position more advanced than yours. Might be another student or someone you met when you were both students.

Wendy Roldan:

How important were relationships to finding your opportunities? How did you navigate the awkwardness of asking for referrals or help finding positions? How did someone else extend an opportunity for you in a way that felt graceful?

Kiley Sobel:

Make connections BEFORE the exact opportunity is available. Don't wait until you see a particular job. Build relationships with people who are making the kind of impact you want. That feels more genuine.

Deborah Fields:

Relationships start early and you don't know where they will lead.

Maintain connections with people mentors introduce you to.

Sometimes you connect over hobbies - people just approach me because I knit publicly.

Approach people with deep respect.

Andres Lombana-Bermudez:

For Andres: How do you make an impact in the diverse Colombian context? How do you meet the expectations of your boss and your own expectations?

There is a shortage of resources in Colombia. It can be difficult to find research funding. At universities you need to start negotiating your agenda as a researcher and balance it with the teaching aspects. The emphasis here is more on teaching.

If you can create your own non-profit/institution, you will have more control over your own priorities because there's not a boss to tell you no.

Wendy Roldan:

What last thoughts or pieces of advice do you have for people wanting to find their place of impact?

Jennifer Pierre:

Be open to new opportunities. Find ways to blend and combine your multiple interests. Carve out space to have more exploratory or informational conversations with people.

Reaching out early sets you up for having relationships and networks later.

Deborah Fields:

Find the heart that keeps you going. You will have to do things that aren't part of your passion. You will find places where your passion stretches out beyond your job. You can't predict where things will happen.

Protect that heart. Find ways that feel authentic to you. Be open to places that will connect with it that you didn't expect.

Andres Lombana-Bermudez:

Find communities whose interests and heart resonate with yours. As you join them and exchange ideas, you may find the pathway that connects your personal interests with the places that you can have an impact.

Kiley Sobel:

Be open to learning through the experience. Through the experience of getting somewhere you might find what fulfills you in an unexpected way.

Things will change and that's okay.

Wendy Roldan:

What's one thing you're looking forward to continuing or trying new as you navigate your path?

Deborah Fields:

Supporting and studying K-12 computer science teachers without having prior experience in K-12. Advocating for them through publications and academia. Find ways to support them, their creativity & impact on students.

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Kimberly Hirsh @KimberlyHirsh
IndieWebCamp An IndieWeb Webring  This work is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 .

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We must acknowledge that much of what we know of this country today, including its culture, economic growth, and development throughout history and across time, has been made possible by the labor of enslaved Africans and their ascendants who suffered the horror of the transatlantic trafficking of their people, chattel slavery, and Jim Crow. We are indebted to their labor and their sacrifice, and we must acknowledge the tremors of that violence throughout the generations and the resulting impact that can still be felt and witnessed today. I thank Dr. Terah ‘TJ’ Stewart for the text of this labor acknowledgement.