Posts in: Books

Sent my mom the Six of Crows duology for her Kindle. Pretty pleased with myself. πŸ“š

πŸ”– Read Tamsyn Muir Understood the Assignment: The Locked Tomb Series’ Expansive Exploration of Death and Grieving by Emma Leff πŸ“š

Life just ran more smoothly when she got her way. Leigh Bardugo, KING OF SCARS

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Finished reading: The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic by Leigh Bardugo πŸ“š

I definitely want to write a longer review of this one, but I need some time to sit with it first. I love it.

What gave her strength then? We cannot know for sure. That contrary thing inside her? The hard stone of rage that all lonely girls possess? - Leigh Bardugo, THE LANGUAGE OF THORNS πŸ’¬πŸ“š

Easy magic is pretty. Great magic asks that you trouble the waters. It requires a disruption, something new.Leigh Bardugo, THE LANGUAGE OF THORNS

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Since the Micro.blog community is starting a reading group in the near future, I thought it would be a good time to talk about my reading habits and tastes.

My favorite books I’ve read in recent …

Currently reading: The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic by Leigh Bardugo πŸ“š

I have so much respect for how dark Bardugo is willing to go with these fairytales. The twist is consistent but shocks me each time.

I started reading A Court of Thorns and Roses because it’s, um, overdue & 9 people have it on hold (sorry people, thanks library for eliminating fines). I don’t know why I waited so long to start this series. It’s very much my thing. πŸ“š

Want to read: The Comedy of Survival: Literary Ecology and a Play Ethic by Joseph W. Meeker πŸ“š

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